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Programs : Brochure

  • Locations: Oxford, England
  • Program Terms: Summer
  • Budget Sheets: Summer
  • This program is currently not accepting applications.
Dates / Deadlines:
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Summer 2020 02/14/2020
**
07/05/2020 08/07/2020

** Some programs accept students on a rolling admission basis. Students may be notified prior to this date of acceptance into the program.

Indicates that deadline has passed
Fact Sheet:
Fact Sheet:
Click here for a definition of this term Areas of Study: English, History, Interdisciplinary Studies in Society and Culture, International Studies, Music, Political Science, Theater Studies Click here for a definition of this term Minimum GPA: 2.5
Click here for a definition of this term Language of Instruction: English Click here for a definition of this term Program Type: Emory Faculty-Led
Click here for a definition of this term Program Advisor: Laura Ochs
Program Description:

Overview

 


Overview

The British Studies Program resides at St. Anne’s College, founded in 1879 to allow women from any financial background to study at Oxford.  It is located near the heart of Oxford, adjacent to the University Parks and the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter and within walking distance to the Bodleian Library and the colorful Cowley neighborhood. Students live, dine, and study in an atmosphere rich in cultural heritage and intellectual accomplishment. Students have ample time for weekend travel or for enjoyment of Oxford’s many resources: the world’s greatest bookstore (Blackwell’s), the highly-praised renovation of the Ashmolean Museum, Holywell Music Rooms, Blenheim Palace, and punting on the Isis and Cherwell.

This year the curriculum presents two courses in British Studies, a seminar on the novels of Jane Austen that fulfills a writing requirement, and a philosophy course on various forms and practices of British art.  The program supplements the regular curriculum with lectures and informal talks on aspects of British society and culture by distinguished visitors.  It also sponsors class visits to London, Bath, and sites of interest in and around Oxford.  The entire group travels to London twice for a range of cultural and historical visits, including a performance at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre.
 

Location

 

Location

  • Oxford is one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse city within England
  • It is built around Oxford University, the oldest university in the English speaking world, making it a true “college town”
  • Oxford is located on the River Thames, and is a short distance to London
  • Oxford’s city center is home to many shops, restaurants, and pubs bustling with college students,  locals, and tourists who come to indulge in the historic architecture of the buildings
  • Home to several parks (28 nature reserves to be exact), Oxford truly makes you appreciate the beauty of Mother Nature
Oxford rooftops
 

Application Process

 

Application Process

Application Deadlines: Applications will be accepted starting December 13.  The application deadline is February 14.  Emory College Study Abroad encourages students to submit their applications as early as possible, as some programs reach capacity by the end of January.

Acceptance Process: This program accepts applications on a rolling basis.
 

 Dates

Dates

July 5, 2020 to August 7, 2020 (The official program dates are the arrival and departure dates for the program)
 

Eligibility

 

Eligibility

  • Students must meet the regular Emory College Study Abroad eligibility requirements in addition to the following program-specific requirements:
    • Visiting students from other institutions are welcome to apply
    • Cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher
 
 

Academics

 

Academics

ENG 383RW: Jane Austen.  4 credit hours
Taught by Prof. Paul Kelleher.  Early in Jane Austen’s novel, Northanger Abbey (1817), the narrator delivers a rousing defense of the species of fiction we now conventionally call “the novel”: “[T]here seems almost a general wish of decrying the capacity and undervaluing the labour of the novelist, and of slighting the performances which have only genius, wit, and taste to recommend them.  ‘I am no novel-reader—I seldom look into novels—Do not imagine that I often read novels—It is really very well for a novel.’  Such is the common cant.  ‘And what are you reading, Miss—?’  ‘Oh! It is only a novel!’ replies the young lady, while she lays down her book with affected indifference, or momentary shame….or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language.”  Austen’s defense of the novels published in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries is, at the same time, a strikingly accurate description of what generations of readers have cherished most about Austen’s own novels: their profound insights into human nature, their often scathing use of humor and irony, and (perhaps most importantly) their dazzling display of linguistic virtuosity and authority.  This course will offer an intensive investigation into the literary and cultural achievement of Jane Austen.  Austen’s works have been central to the development of the novel in Britain, influencing and shaping many of the formal and intellectual characteristics that continue to define the genre of the novel.  Among other topics, our discussions will focus on how Austen pioneered the novelistic representation of “reality”; experimented with the literary uses of character, plot, and narrative voice; developed complicated visions of human psychology; and explored the (often interconnected) questions of romantic love, economic competition, and social ambition. In addition to readings and discussion, students will write a major research paper (18-20 pages) on a particular aspect of Austen’s literary and cultural importance, the precise focus of which will be worked out in consultation with Professor Kelleher.  The course will fulfill a writing requirement of Emory College.

PHIL 385: Art: The Uncommitted Crime.  4 credit hours.
Taught by Professor John Lysaker.  Theodor Adorno has suggested that all art is an uncommitted crime.  More than entertainment, artworks are invitations, sometimes demands that we transform the world.  Its materials should be remade, it rules broken and art exemplifies how that might be done.  This course explores this thesis. What challenges does art pose and with what effects?  And what are some of the ways in which readers, listeners, and viewers can respond to art’s transgressive energies? We will pursue these and other questions by engaging a variety of art forms, focusing on artists from Britain including the poet W.H. Auden, the philosopher/novelist Iris Murdoch (who was a fellow at St. Anne’s College, Oxford), the visual-artist/musician Brian Eno, and the painter J.M.W. Turner.  We also will look at gardens as artworks, and, through the writing of Rebecca Solnit, consider walking as a potentially artful activity.  In addition to short readings, reflection papers, and class discussion, there will be excursions to encounter some of the artworks we will discuss.  Students also must write a term paper (10-12 pages) on an artwork of their choice, developing their topic in consultation with Professor Lysaker.
  
 

Housing

 

Housing

Students will be housed in single rooms.  Each room has a it's own bathroom sink, but other bathroom facilities (shower and toilets) will be shared. The rooms are on the campus of St. Anne's College.
 

Cost and Funding

 

Cost and Funding

A full description of the program costs and billing procedures is described in the budget sheet

The Dewey-Hinton Scholarship is an excellent opportunity for students interested in the British Studies Program.  Applications for Dewey-Hinton are due February 1st.  Apply online here: http://abroad.emory.edu/?go=DeweyHinton

Emory undergraduate students who qualify are considered by the Office of Financial Aid for a summer aid award after registration in summer study abroad classes. The amount of the award depends on the number of credits and current financial aid package. Students currently receiving financial aid from Emory are typically eligible. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for information about specific awards. Emory Scholars are informed separately about the procedures for Scholars Summer Study Abroad awards. Emory University Employee Courtesy Scholarships may be applied to the academic fee portion of the summer study abroad program's cost. For more information, please see Summer Study Abroad Scholarships.
 

Policies

 

Policies

Each summer study abroad program will have at least one mandatory pre-departure orientation session and/or other pre-departure activities for accepted program participants. The Program Director will contact program participants with details.  Emory College Study Abroad will also require all students to complete a mandatory online pre-departure orientation by April 15. This assignment will be deployed through Canvas early April.


Summer Study Abroad Refund Policy
Summer Study Abroad Information for Visiting Students  
 

Contacts

 

Contacts

Dr. Paul Kelleher
Program Director
Department of English
paul.kelleher@emory.edu

Laura Ochs
Study Abroad Director
laura.ochs@emory.edu



This program is currently not accepting applications.